Aging and Your Eyes

Steve Jacobsen
by Steve Jacobsen

9.29-Aging-Eyes_blog

It’s inevitable, as we age, so do our eyes. There are several age-related conditions that can happen no matter how healthy of lives we live or whether or not we’ve got a fantastic set of DNA handed down to us by our relatives.

Presbyopia. Presbyopia occurs typically after the age of 40. This can be noticed as blurred vision when doing up-close work. People start to notice it when they need to hold books, menus, etc. farther and farther away in order to see clearly. Presbyopia occurs because of a hardening of the natural lens inside your eye, and it is very common. Almost everyone will experience it in various forms. Optical treatment is usually the best remedy via reading glasses, progressive lenses or bifocals. There are also options for contact lens wearers as well.

Reduced pupil size. As we age, our pupil size starts to gradually become smaller and makes us less responsive to changes in lighting. Older individuals might find themselves needing more light to read and have difficulty moving in between light and dark environments quickly (from a dark theater to sunlight). This is also one of the causes for difficulty driving at night. Adjusting from darkness to bright oncoming traffic can make driving at night difficult. There are many optical products that can help this situation. A photochromic lens (like Transitions™) or anti-glare coatings on lenses can help older drivers adjust to differing light conditions more easily.

Dry Eyes. As we age, we may experience itchy, dry eyes. The condition affects many people, especially women after menopause. They may experience scratchy burning sensations in various conditions and may find that traditional over-the-counter eye drops don’t seem to remedy the problem. There are actually several different types of Dry Eye Disease, and your optometrist could help you determine which one you suffer from by examining the quality of your tears. Treatment for Dry Eye Disease can include prescription eye drops or in-office procedures like LipiFlow that can provide relief.

Loss of peripheral vision. On average, as you age your field of vision decreases by one to three percent every decade. Peripheral vision loss can also be a sign of glaucoma and serious ocular disease, so it important to have it checked out. This type of loss can make driving dangerous as it can be difficult to see objects not in your direct vision. Whether your peripheral vision loss is gradual or sudden, it is important to bring up your concerns with your eye doctor to see if there is a serious underlying medical issue.

http://www.allaboutvision.com/over60/vision-changes.htm

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