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Halloween Safety: Costume Contacts

ECS

10.24_Halloween-Safety_Blog

As Halloween approaches, a trend that has been really taking off over the past few years is the wearing of costume contact lenses. While the effect can be stunning, it is important to take safety into consideration when choosing contact lenses as part of your costume.

Contact lenses require a prescription, because they are classified as medical devices by the FDA. Since they come in direct contact with your body, it is important that the fit and quality of the lenses are correct for your unique eyes, or there can be extreme consequences.

There have been reports of eye scratches, eye fatigue and even blindness when costume contact lenses haven’t been prescribed or monitored by an eye care professional. Over-the-counter contacts can also be full of bacteria and can cause serious infections to your eyes as well. Your best bet is to purchase your contact lenses through your eye doctor.

Be safe this Halloween season and protect your eyes. We want to make sure you are able to enjoy many years of ghouls and goblins in the future.

Myopia Control

Dr. Pfeil

What is Myopia?
Myopia is nearsightedness or difficulty seeing objects in the distance. It can also cause squinting, eyestrain, headaches and eye fatigue. Myopia currently affects approximately 1/3 of adults currently in the United States. Myopia usually starts in childhood and worsens over time.

myopia_control-01The issue lies within the shape of the eyeball in relation to the curvature of the cornea and the lens of the eye.

What causes Myopia?
No one is entirely sure. Studies show that heredity does play a part in whether or not someone develops myopia. If both parents wear glasses, there is a higher likelihood that their child will also need them. There are also some studies that suggest that reading may play a role in myopia development.

Our goal at ECS is to treat the myopic condition and to slow its progression.

There are several treatment options for myopia. Traditional glasses and contact lenses offer clear vision but do not slow the myopia. LASIK surgery can work for adults but is not recommended for children. Pharmaceutical intervention through medical eye drops can help control the progression of myopia for a while, but have negative side effects. Orthokeratology is the wearing of specially designed gas permeable contact lenses that reshape your cornea while you sleep. This can help slow the progression of myopia, but does not offer a permanent solution.

Therapeutic Multifocal Lenses
In recent research, the use of contact lenses, in which a patient’s prescription is in the middle of the contact lens surrounded by plus power, has shown to reduce myopia progression by 40-50%. It is suggested that when using these contact lenses to slow the progression of myopia that the patient utilize this modality until their early twenties.The center optics of the contact lens will correct for the myopia and deliver focused light rays on to the macula at the back of the eye. The peripheral retina is what studies have shown to be the driving force for the elongation of the eye leading to an increase in myopia. With distance only correction, the macula will have a focused image delivered to it, but the rays being delivered to the peripheral retina will not be focused on the retina, rather behind it. By placing the plus power around the myopia prescription, the light rays in the peripheral retina are focused on or in front of the retina helping to reduce the tendency for the elongation of the eye.

Doctor Q&A: What is Myopia and How is it Treated?

Dr. Pfeil

In our latest Doctor Q&A, find out more about myopia and discover how a new treatment for children may be able to slow the progression of myopia which may help to prevent cataracts, glaucoma and other eye diseases later in life.

 

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